The Agent Search

The resources on this page can be helpful in your search for an agent.

  • Association of Authors’ Representatives
  • Literary Market Place 2014: The Directory of the American Book Publishing Industry
  • Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors, and Literary Agents 2012, 22E: Who They Are! What They Want! How to Win Them Over!
  • Chuck Sambuchino’s Guide to Literary Agents Blog
  • Literary Agent Undercover
  • Publishers Marketplace aka Publishers Lunch is worth the $25/month subscription fee for all of the daily highlights of what’s happening in the business and the access to contacts and deals
  • Another great source for industry gossip and who’s doing what to whom, as well as information about seminars and workshops is: MediaBistro’s Galley Cat.
  • The organization Poets & Writers offers all kinds of resources and information to its members, and the articles in the magazine by and about writers and the writing experience and valuable in the perspective they can give you on the writing life, and what it means to be an author in this day and time. Highly recommended if you don’t know it already.
  • The Forest for the Trees An Editor’s Advice to Writers by Betsy Lerner. It includes a chapter “Making Contact: Seeking Agents and Publication”. This chapter is worth the price of the book many times over.
  • I also commend to you the archive of Betsy’s blog, The Forest for the Trees. Betsy was, for many years, an editor at several major publishing houses, and then jumped to the agent side, selling mostly non-fiction, where she is very successful. Her blog reached a community of writers who shared their struggles, fears, joys and sorrows, failures and successes in response to her daily question “where are you today as a writer” posed as a set piece in all manner of circumstances. She is a brilliant and very funny woman.
  • Thinking Like Your Editor How to Write Great Serious Non-fiction and Get It Published by Susan Rabiner and Alfred Fortunato. I have found this book to be extraordinarily helpful in directing authors of non-fiction projects in the construction of the all important proposal for the book idea you have. Not only does the editor want to see this proposal, so does the agent, and the agent will work with you to develop it, so it sells the book idea to the appropriate editor for the project.
  • How to Get Happily Published by Judith Appelbaum—this is a wonderfully succinct overview of how the publishing business works, and how you the author can maximize your position in the traditional publishing forum.
  • The Writer’s Market Guide to Getting Published—The Writer’s Market has been around for a long time, and is a great provider of solid, basic information about the publishing industry and opportunities for authors.

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